Back to School: How E-Learning Can Help Schools After the End of the Pandemic

Ask a teacher how they’re holding up during the pandemic and you’re likely to get a textbook chucked at your head. The reaction would probably be something similar if you checked in on a student or parent. School daze took on a whole new meaning starting in the spring, when educators found themselves scrambling to cobble together an online schooling plan on the fly. The learning curve has been a steep one ever since, and seemingly all involved are still wrapping their heads around the logistics of hitting the books virtually.

Just don’t mistake growing pains for futility. Universities have been making forms of remote learning work for decades, and we have certain modern infrastructure and experiences adapted from the corporate world – Zoom, anyone? – that give us a head start in solving the conundrum of conducting online classes on a mass scale. E-Learning isn’t likely to replace brick-and-mortar classrooms and butts in desks over the long haul. But you can bet educators are taking notes on how to apply the concept to solve persistent problems and enhance the educational experience after the bell rings on the pandemic and hallways and home rooms begin bustling again.

Though InPlayer’s Moment product is largely oriented to sports franchises, organizations and rights holders, the concepts can be applied to education as well. “Moment” allows sports fans to select which parts of a game they want to watch — all without a subscription. The same can be applied to the classroom. A student that wants to review a particular part of a lesson could easily access it through this product, for example. As the global e-learning industry is projected to reach $398 billion by 2026, the key factors favoring this market growth are flexibility in learning, low costs, easy accessibility and increased effectiveness by animated learning. 

Through our seamless technology, InPlayer is providing a payment gateway integration for online education and e-learning, allowing education enterprise customers to transform their OVPs into a direct-to-consumer application with industry-leading pay-per-view and subscription functionalities.

A few other ways e-learning — and InPlayer —  can help schools after the end of the pandemic:

Sick days. Gone are the days of Junior’s older sister gathering up schoolwork from his teachers to lug home for the boy to struggle through after his fever breaks. Online learning offers the opportunity to create custom lectures and lesson plans, or evergreen courses that can be sectioned off and plucked from as needed. Instead of losing days or weeks of learning to chicken pox or mono, a sick student now has the resources to keep up or catch up when they’re ready.

Summer school. This was practically an entire genre of film in the ‘80s, and the jokes pretty much wrote themselves: uninterested teachers, checked-out students and stunted learning. After the nine-month grind of the traditional American school year, everyone is ready for a change of pace. The flexibility of e-learning allows both teachers and students to sleep late, work on their tans and still squeeze in that economics class at their leisure.

Tutoring. Whether it’s studying for the SAT or mastering flute scales, students can greatly benefit from working with trained experts in specialized fields. And because most tutoring sessions occur off-premise and outside school hours, a remote platform can help facilitate the schedules of both teachers and pupils.

More emergencies. As hard as it may be to hear, we may face another pandemic in our lifetimes. Possibly more than one. Even now, wildfires are raging on the West Coast. Tornadoes, hurricanes and other natural disasters can displace people – read: students and teachers – from their homes for weeks at a time. If e-learning can help a student stay on track academically and provide some structure during a trying time, then educators will soon regard it as a welcome addition to their backpack of tools.

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Back to School: How E-Learning Can Help Schools After the End of the Pandemic

Ask a teacher how they’re holding up during the pandemic and you’re likely to get a textbook chucked at your head. The reaction would probably be something similar if you checked in on a student or parent. School daze took on a whole new meaning starting in the spring, when educators found themselves scrambling to cobble together an online schooling plan on the fly. The learning curve has been a steep one ever since, and seemingly all involved are still wrapping their heads around the logistics of hitting the books virtually.

Just don’t mistake growing pains for futility. Universities have been making forms of remote learning work for decades, and we have certain modern infrastructure and experiences adapted from the corporate world – Zoom, anyone? – that give us a head start in solving the conundrum of conducting online classes on a mass scale. E-Learning isn’t likely to replace brick-and-mortar classrooms and butts in desks over the long haul. But you can bet educators are taking notes on how to apply the concept to solve persistent problems and enhance the educational experience after the bell rings on the pandemic and hallways and home rooms begin bustling again.

Though InPlayer’s Moment product is largely oriented to sports franchises, organizations and rights holders, the concepts can be applied to education as well. “Moment” allows sports fans to select which parts of a game they want to watch — all without a subscription. The same can be applied to the classroom. A student that wants to review a particular part of a lesson could easily access it through this product, for example. As the global e-learning industry is projected to reach $398 billion by 2026, the key factors favoring this market growth are flexibility in learning, low costs, easy accessibility and increased effectiveness by animated learning. 

Through our seamless technology, InPlayer is providing a payment gateway integration for online education and e-learning, allowing education enterprise customers to transform their OVPs into a direct-to-consumer application with industry-leading pay-per-view and subscription functionalities.

A few other ways e-learning — and InPlayer —  can help schools after the end of the pandemic:

Sick days. Gone are the days of Junior’s older sister gathering up schoolwork from his teachers to lug home for the boy to struggle through after his fever breaks. Online learning offers the opportunity to create custom lectures and lesson plans, or evergreen courses that can be sectioned off and plucked from as needed. Instead of losing days or weeks of learning to chicken pox or mono, a sick student now has the resources to keep up or catch up when they’re ready.

Summer school. This was practically an entire genre of film in the ‘80s, and the jokes pretty much wrote themselves: uninterested teachers, checked-out students and stunted learning. After the nine-month grind of the traditional American school year, everyone is ready for a change of pace. The flexibility of e-learning allows both teachers and students to sleep late, work on their tans and still squeeze in that economics class at their leisure.

Tutoring. Whether it’s studying for the SAT or mastering flute scales, students can greatly benefit from working with trained experts in specialized fields. And because most tutoring sessions occur off-premise and outside school hours, a remote platform can help facilitate the schedules of both teachers and pupils.

More emergencies. As hard as it may be to hear, we may face another pandemic in our lifetimes. Possibly more than one. Even now, wildfires are raging on the West Coast. Tornadoes, hurricanes and other natural disasters can displace people – read: students and teachers – from their homes for weeks at a time. If e-learning can help a student stay on track academically and provide some structure during a trying time, then educators will soon regard it as a welcome addition to their backpack of tools.

TALK TO US

 

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